{}
CLOSE

Now Commenting On:

{"content":["2008_ds_cha_vs_tba" ] }

Rays-White Sox Game 4 tidbits

Rays-White Sox Game 4 tidbits

|
Heating up: The two home runs by Rays center fielder B.J. Upton in Game 4 gave him three long balls in a span of four at-bats, dating back to Game 3. Prior to his two-run homer in the seventh inning on Sunday, Upton had only one homer in his previous 114 at-bats -- a power outage that spanned 31 games. Upton became the 110th player to hit two home runs in a playoff game, and the fourth this week. The others were the Phillies' Pat Burrell, the Angels' Mike Napoli, and Rays teammate Evan Longoria.

Cooling off: Longoria started his postseason career with three hits -- two home runs and a single in Game 1 -- but since then he is 1-for-12 with six strikeouts.

complete postseason coverage

Early hook: Gavin Floyd's fourth-inning exit was the shortest outing by a White Sox starter in the postseason since Jason Bere and Jack McDowell both lasted 2 1/3 innings in Games 4 and 5 of the 1993 American League Championship Series at Toronto.

Wise move: The White Sox had just two hits for multiple RBIs in their series against the Rays. Both of them came from Dewayne Wise, who hit a three-run homer in Game 1 and doubled in two runs in Game 3.

Not like Jim: This was Jim Thome's first postseason series without a home run since the 1997 ALCS with the Indians against the Orioles. He had homered in his last five playoff series, including four homers each in the 1998 ALCS and 1999 AL Division Series. Thome has hit home runs in eight of his 12 career postseason series.

Central is MIA: Neither LCS will include a team from the Central division, the first time that has happened since 2001 and just the third time since the three-division postseason format went into effect in 1995. The other year was 1999.

{"content":["2008_ds_cha_vs_tba" ] }
{"content":["2008_ds_cha_vs_tba" ] }
Boys and Girls Club of America

©2014 MLBAM, LP. All rights reserved.

The following are trademarks or service marks of Major League Baseball entities and may be used only with permission of Major League Baseball Properties, Inc. or the relevant Major League Baseball entity: Major League, Major League Baseball, MLB, the silhouetted batter logo, World Series, National League, American League, Division Series, League Championship Series, All-Star Game, and the names, nicknames, logos, uniform designs, color combinations, and slogans designating the Major League Baseball clubs and entities, and their respective mascots, events and exhibitions. Use of the Website signifies your agreement to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy (updated May 24, 2013).

View MLB.com in English | En Español